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Humanities 

Subject Leader: Miss Mukwakwa

History

Our vision:

History is about real people who lived, and real events which happened in the past. History is concerned with sequence, time and chronology and is the study of evidence about the past; it gives us a sense of identity, set within our social, political, cultural and economic relationships. History fires the children’s curiosity about the past in Britain and the wider world and plays an essential part in preparing us for living and working in the contemporary world. Pupils consider how the past influences the present, what past societies were like, how these societies organised their politics, and what beliefs and cultures influenced people’s actions. As they do this, children develop a chronological framework for their knowledge of significant events and people. They see the diversity of human experience, and understand more about themselves as individuals and members of society. What they learn can influence their decisions about personal choices, attitudes and values. In history, children find evidence, weigh it up and reach their own conclusions. To do this they need to be able to research, sift through evidence, and argue for their point of view – skills that are prized in adult life.

We at Harlesden Primary School have a duty to ensure compliance with the revised National Curriculum and with the application of the new programmes of study and attainment targets. We understand that 'the National Curriculum provides pupils with an introduction to the core knowledge that they need to be educated citizens.' We feel that our well-balanced curriculum promotes the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of all pupils and prepares them for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of later life.

Our aim:

  • To know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world
  • To know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind
  • To gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’
  • To understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • To understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed
  • To gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts: understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales. 

 

Geography

Our vision:

The study of geography should stimulate an interest in and a sense of wonder about places, people and processes at a variety of different scales around the world. It explains where places are, how places and landscapes are formed and continually shaped, how people and their environment interact, and how a diverse range of economies, societies and environments are interconnected and change over time. Through teaching, we help pupils make sense of a complex and dynamically changing world. As pupils progress, their growing knowledge about the world should help them to deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, and of the formation and uses of landscapes and environments.

 

We at Harlesden Primary School have a duty to ensure compliance with the revised National Curriculum and with the application of the new programmes of study and attainment targets. We understand that 'the National Curriculum provides pupils with an introduction to the core knowledge that they need to be educated citizens.' We feel that our well-balanced curriculum promotes the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of all pupils and prepares them for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of later life.

Our aim:

  • To develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places – both terrestrial and marine – including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes
  • To understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time
  • To make sure children are competent in the geographical skills needed to: collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes.
  • To interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS).
  • To communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length.

 (The National Curriculum in England Framework Document (DfE) 2014)